Developmental Milestones For Ages 5-7 Years of Age

By AASLDecember 3, 2020

Childhood development is complex. Between fine motor and gross motor development, and the variability between children, it’s not always easy to tell if your child’s development is considered “typical.” If you’re worried that your child’s writing and pre-writing development may be atypical, here is a tool for you to use. These are the developmental milestones in writing that average children meet by certain ages. Also, there are lists of indications that your child’s fine motor/handwriting development may be atypical.

1. Between the ages 5-6 years, typical children will be able to do the following:

  • Draw a person – Draw a person with at least 6 parts and draw a face with two eyes, a nose, and a mouth.
  • Print letters – By 5-6 years old, children should be able to print their own name from memory (without looking at a model), and copy most upper and lower case letters, and numbers 1-5.
  • Holding the pencil like a grown-up – Hold a regular sized pencil like an adult does.
  • Curved mazes – Draw smooth lines to follow a maze that has curved tracks (rather than just straight tracks).
  • Triangles – Copy triangles and trace diamonds.
  • Use dominant hand – Consistent use of one hand as the dominant hand.
  • Letters and numbers – By age 6, print all letters in the alphabet and all numbers 1-10 without copying.

If your child hasn’t met the following milestones by age 6, he may benefit from occupational therapy.

  • Drawing basic shapes
  • Holding a pencil like an adult would
  • Making recognizable drawings of people and objects
  • Coloring inside the lines in a coloring book
  • Drawing most letters and numbers
  • Using a dominant hand for most drawing and writing

2. Between the ages 6-7 years old, children should typically be able to do the following:

  • Print – all letters and numbers from memory. Between 6-7 years children should be able to write the entire alphabet without skipping letters or switching between upper and lower case.
  • Write – By 7 years old, children should be able to write complete sentences with proper capitalization and punctuation and without any reversals.

If your child is 7 years or older and you notice any of the issues below, she or he may benefit from occupational therapy.

  • Awkward looking grip on pencil compared to others his age
  • Dislikes or refuses to participate in drawing or writing activities that are typical for her age
  • Draws and prints letters and pictures that look sloppy for his age
  • Is frustrated by tasks that involve drawing and writing
  • Makes many mistakes when writing letters, especially in grade 2 or above

Reference
Case-Smith, J., & OBrien, J. C. (2014). Occupational Therapy For Children. St. Louis: Mosby.

DISCLAIMER: Information published about one particular disorder does not necessarily apply to every individual who has the disorder discussed in this article. Treatments, therapies and suggestions are highly individual and must be customized to the needs of each person to be effective. Do not make changes to your/your child’s treatment plan as a result of what you read in this article (or any content published by AASL) without consulting your/your child’s physicians and therapists. This content does not necessarily reflect the opinions of All About Speech and Language or its therapists. To understand the opinions and recommendations of your/your child’s AASL therapist, schedule an appointment with your therapist to discuss your concerns.

Reference
Case-Smith, J., & OBrien, J. C. (2014). Occupational Therapy For Children. St. Louis: Mosby.

DISCLAIMER: Information published about one particular disorder does not necessarily apply to every individual who has the disorder discussed in this article. Treatments, therapies and suggestions are highly individual and must be customized to the needs of each person to be effective. Do not make changes to your/your child’s treatment plan as a result of what you read in this article (or any content published by AASL) without consulting your/your child’s physicians and therapists. This content does not necessarily reflect the opinions of All About Speech and Language or its therapists. To understand the opinions and recommendations of your/your child’s AASL therapist, schedule an appointment with your therapist to discuss your concerns.

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